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Children's Hospice

Project

The Foundation on the frontline

in-proud-partnership

“We are delighted to partner with the McGowan Government for this project. We believe the facility with all the care of a hospital and the feel of a home is long overdue and will add a wonderful legacy to the healthcare landscape for children and their families. We couldn’t be more thrilled to be involved with this project which will make a difference to so many lives for years to come and are eager to get started.”

Hon. Ian Campbell, Chairman Perth Children’s Hospital Foundation

About the Project

In proud partnership with the Child and Adolescent Health Service (CAHS), we are pleased to announce the Perth Children’s Hospital Foundation funding of a brand new Children’s Hospice in Perth, WA. This hospice will provide care for children aged from birth to 18 years who have a life-limiting condition and are requiring palliative care. We know this will make a significant difference to the lives of WA families requiring these services.

There is currently a widely acknowledged gap in the provision of children’s respite and end of life services in Western Australia.

Although a child might not receive a diagnosis of a life limiting condition, their journey could span weeks, months, or even years. This often results in a great stress on families for a sustained period of time and impacts their resources, relationships and well-being.

We are so excited to take you on this journey in proud partnership with Child and Adolescent Health Service (CAHS). To keep up to date, follow along on our social channels.

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Children's Hospice Design

The hospice will be modelled on Bear Cottage in NSW as a home away from home environment. Ideally it will be a six-bed facility with adjoining family rooms. Every child’s room will be fitted with a hospital constituted bed and facilities. Other features will include a commercial kitchen, community living space, hydrotherapy pool, outdoor area and playground. The facility design will combine clinical and operational requirements in a quality architectural purpose-built facility that has a home-like feel offering flexibility of spaces, high amenity and is sympathetic to the surrounds.

The hospice will provide services in key areas:

  • Care for children who have a life limiting diagnosis with little prospect of being well and who require 24/7 care. The hospice will assume care of these children for a period of time allowing their families much needed respite.
  • End of life care for children with the safety net of clinical care in the comfort of a highly respectful and supported environment.
  • Support for the families of life limited children.
  • State-wide bereavement service for families following the death of a child.
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All renders are architects concepts.

Children's Hospice Project Progress

CITY OF NEDLANDS COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT: The city of Nedlands is calling on community members to provide their feedback on the hospice proposal by 5pm on 26 September 2020. You can submit your positive feedback by clicking through to this submission form.

Children's Hospice Publications

Media Monitoring & Updates

Media Release
Western Australia set to welcome first Children's Hospice
Read article
WA Today
WA's first children's hospice to care for terminally ill children
Read article
9 News Perth
Much needed help on the way for WA children suffering from life limiting illness
Watch Video
The West Australian
Sea views for kids' hospice
Read article
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Please direct any media inquiries to:

Caroline Webb
Head of Marketing
Perth Children’s Hospital Foundation
08 6456 5546
caroline.webb@pchf.org.au
Cait Woodward
Communications Manager
Child and Adolescent Health Service (CAHS)
08 6456 3278
cait.woodward@health.wa.gov.au

Children's Hospice FAQ's

A paediatric hospice (Children’s Hospice) is dedicated to caring for children aged birth to 18 years with life-limiting conditions and requiring palliative care.

A Children’s Hospice provides paediatric palliative care 24 hours a day during a child’s stay. Paediatric palliative care enables the baby, child or young person to live in an environment where curative treatment can be part of their life, but not their entire focus. It aims to provide the best quality of life through a holistic approach which supports the physical, emotional, social and spiritual aspects of the child and their family.

Children’s hospices add value to care in a number of ways: symptom assessment and treatment, provision of respite care and supportive work with siblings, parents and grandparents. Furthermore, some children and families will choose the hospice as the preferred place for end of life care. Following the death of a child, bereavement care for families is an essential part of service provision.

There is a widely acknowledged gap in the provision of children’s respite and end of life services in Western Australia. Although a child might receive a diagnosis of a life limiting condition, their journey could span weeks, months or even years. This often results in a great stress on families for a sustained period of time and impacts their resources, relationships and well-being.

Three similar services exist on the east coast, providing an extensive range of services for families of children diagnosed with life-limiting conditions. They are Bear Cottage in NSW, Very Special Kids in Victoria and Hummingbird House in Queensland. Currently nothing of this nature exists in WA. Internationally, the Children’s Hospice model is recognised as a successful approach to care for children and families with life-limiting conditions. With Australia’s population of 23 million people, there are only three such centres whereas in the United Kingdom, with a population of almost 66 million, there are now over 40 similar centres for children.

Western Australia does not have a dedicated paediatric hospice facility. Currently, children under palliative care are provided services by the WA Paediatric Palliative Care Service at Perth Children’s Hospital. Although this service provides advice, support and liaison for children and families, there are only two options for care of children with life-limiting illnesses at home or at Hospital. Families who do not want their child to die at home can currently only be supported in hospital. There is currently no palliative out of home respite care for children in WA.

The number of children receiving a palliative care clinical service in 2015 was 24 compared to 64 at the end of 2019 and the service has recently included children with cancer which will increase demand. As expectations around hospice care for children evolve and demand for hospice care grows, a purpose-built facility is needed.

Children’s hospices add value to care in a number of ways: symptom assessment and treatment, provision of respite care and supportive work with siblings, parents and grandparents, including:

  • Care for children who have a life limiting diagnosis with little prospect of being well and who require 24/7 care. The hospice will assume care of these children for a period of time allowing their families much needed respite.
  • End of life care for children with the safety net of clinical care in the comfort of a highly respectful and supported environment.
  • Support for the families of life limited children.
  • State-wide bereavement service for families following the death of a child.

The hospice will be modelled on Bear Cottage in NSW as a home away from home environment. Ideally it will be a six-bed facility with adjoining family rooms. Every child’s room will be fitted with a hospital constituted bed and facilities. Other features will include a commercial kitchen, community living space, hydrotherapy pool, outdoor area and playground treatment centre, car park for visitors, basement with car park for an ambulance, landscaped gardens.

The proposed Children’s Hospice site is located within Allen Park situated at Lot 500 Clement Street Swanbourne. The site is the former Swanbourne Bowling Club, immediately to the north of the current WA Bridge Club.

The site is surrounded by open space in a natural, serene and coastal environment, important factors for the clinical experience of patients and families. The site has discrete access which can be managed given the minimal traffic impact expected through the facility. Any impact will be considered through a Traffic Management Plan prepared during the design phase.

An artist’s impression of a possible house design has been developed, while potential land plots are being identified.

It is intended the Foundation provides funding for the construction, fit-out and ongoing non-operational costs for the hospice. CAHS will be responsible for securing a suitable land holding, providing ongoing clinical funding, governance and overall management of the hospice.

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